Early Days of Los Angeles

The Cornero Gang & the Infamous Page Brothers: The Early Days of Los Angeles With Dr J. Michael Niotta

Installment 17: The Cornero Gang & the Infamous Page Brother All out warfare over control of SoCal’s illegal liquor market blared throughout the span of the roaring twenties, and stepping into the the new decade, the struggle only continued. The competition too brutal, no single man or organization ever truly sat alone on the top. Los Angeles Times, May 24, 1931 California’s Home-Grown Racketeers, by Albert Nathan How the Local Racketeers Differ from the Well…

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Mayor, Mayor on the Wall: The Early Days of Los Angeles With Dr J. Michael Niotta

Installment 8: Mayor, Mayor on the Wall The level of corruption sanctioned in Los Angeles by way of the mayor’s office throughout the long stretch of prohibition, could easily fuel season after season of award winning television. From real estate scams and rigged elections, bootlegging and gambling houses, to bookmaking, prostitution, and alliances with criminals and shadowy organizations—every Los Angeles mayor who sat behind the desk during “the drought” dabbled in at least some form…


The Senator and the Shield: The Early Days of Los Angeles With Dr J. Michael Niotta

Installment 7: The Senator and the Shield RICO, the infamous Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act of 1970, is credited as one of the most effective tools in the fight against the national crime syndicate. It’s aim for the prosecution of top mob members over mere soldiers, is no doubt largely responsible for its level of success. Earlier introduced and lesser known, was another controversial legislative weapon; one which arrived on the law books not…


Prelude to the Kefauver Hearings: The Early Days of Los Angeles With Dr J. Michael Niotta

Installment 6: Prelude to the Kefauver Hearings In April of 1950, the Senate Gambling Investigating Committee gathered in Washington DC. On the table, was a new bill that they expected would put “a ban on interstate transmission of race horse information.” Chairmen McFarland and his men were on a crusade to rid the nation of the racing wire service which “the country’s thousands of bookies” relied on. Though top officials from such major cities as…